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Landon Miller
Landon Miller

Slums in Mumbai: The Challenges and Opportunities of Dharavi as a Model of Urban Development


# Slums in Mumbai: A Challenge and an Opportunity - Introduction - Define slums and their characteristics - Provide some statistics on the number and population of slums in Mumbai - Explain the main causes and consequences of slum formation in Mumbai - Dharavi: The World's Third Largest Slum - Give a brief history of Dharavi and its location - Describe the living conditions, economic activities, and social diversity of Dharavi - Highlight the challenges and potentials of Dharavi as a model of urban development - Mumbai's Smart Slum: A New Vision for Dharavi - Introduce the concept of smart slums and how they differ from conventional slums - Discuss the current and proposed initiatives to improve Dharavi's infrastructure, services, and governance using technology and community participation - Analyze the benefits and drawbacks of smart slum development for Dharavi and Mumbai - Conclusion - Summarize the main points of the article - Emphasize the need for a holistic and inclusive approach to slum rehabilitation in Mumbai - Provide some recommendations and suggestions for future action Here is the article I have written based on the outline: # Slums in Mumbai: A Challenge and an Opportunity Mumbai, also known as Bombay, is the largest city and the financial capital of India. It is home to more than 20 million people, making it one of the most populous and densest urban areas in the world. However, not all of Mumbai's residents enjoy a high standard of living. According to a 2011 census, about 9 million people, or 41 percent of the city's population, live in slums. Slums are defined by the United Nations as "a heavily populated urban area characterized by substandard housing and squalor". Slums typically lack adequate access to water, sanitation, electricity, health care, education, and security. Slum dwellers often face discrimination, exploitation, violence, and social exclusion. Slums also pose environmental and health risks for both their inhabitants and the city as a whole. The formation of slums in Mumbai is largely attributed to two factors: rapid urbanization and limited housing supply. Mumbai has witnessed a massive influx of migrants from rural areas and other states in search of better opportunities and livelihoods. However, the city has not been able to provide sufficient and affordable housing for its growing population, resulting in overcrowding, squatting, and informal settlements. Moreover, many slum dwellers have no legal rights or security over their land or property, making them vulnerable to eviction and displacement. Slums in Mumbai occupy 12 percent of its total geographic area and up to a quarter of the available construction area in the city. The largest and most famous slum in Mumbai is Dharavi, which is also considered to be the world's third largest slum after Pakistan's Orangi Town (Karachi) and Mexico's Neza-Chalco-Itza (Mexico City). Dharavi is both a challenge and an opportunity for Mumbai's urban development. It represents the harsh realities of poverty, inequality, and marginalization, but also the resilience, creativity, and potential of its residents. ## Dharavi: The World's Third Largest Slum Dharavi is located in the heart of Mumbai, between two major railway lines and near a new business district. It covers an area of about 2.39 square kilometers (0.92 square miles) and has a population of about 1 million people. The population density of Dharavi is estimated at over 277,000 people per square kilometer (717,000 people per square mile), making it one of the most densely populated areas in the world. Dharavi was originally a fishing village on the outskirts of Mumbai. It was incorporated into the city in 1956 and gradually became a hub for migrants from different parts of India. Today, Dharavi is a highly diverse settlement in terms of religion, ethnicity, language, and culture. It hosts Hindus, Muslims, Christians, Sikhs, Buddhists, Jains, Parsis, Dalits (untouchables), OBCs (other backward classes), SCs (scheduled castes), STs (scheduled tribes), Marathis (locals), Tamils, Gujaratis, Biharis, and others. Dharavi is not only a place of residence, but also a place of work. It has an active informal economy that employs many of its inhabitants in various sectors, such as leather, textiles, pottery, recycling, food processing, and services. The annual turnover of Dharavi's enterprises is estimated at over US$ 1 billion. Dharavi is also known for its social and cultural activities, such as festivals, sports, music, art, and education. However, Dharavi also faces many challenges and problems. The living conditions in Dharavi are poor and unhealthy. Most of the houses are made of makeshift materials and have no proper ventilation or drainage. The access to water, sanitation, electricity, health care, education, and security is inadequate and unreliable. The slum dwellers are exposed to various hazards, such as floods, fires, diseases, accidents, and crimes. Dharavi has also suffered from several epidemics and disasters in the past, such as the plague of 1896 that killed over half of the population of Bombay. Dharavi has been the target of several slum rehabilitation schemes since the 1990s. The main objective of these schemes is to relocate the slum dwellers to low-income residential towers and free up the land for commercial development. However, these schemes have faced many obstacles and criticisms from various stakeholders, such as the slum dwellers themselves, the activists, the urban planners, the developers, and the politicians. The main issues include the eligibility criteria, the compensation rates, the quality of the alternative housing, the loss of livelihoods and social networks, the corruption and mismanagement, and the lack of participation and transparency. ## Mumbai's Smart Slum: A New Vision for Dharavi In recent years, a new vision for Dharavi has emerged that challenges the conventional notion of slums as problems to be eradicated or relocated. This vision is based on the concept of smart slums, which are defined as "slums that use technology to improve their infrastructure, services, and governance in a way that is inclusive, participatory, and sustainable". The idea of smart slums is not to impose top-down solutions or to replace existing structures and practices with new ones. Rather, it is to enhance and leverage the existing assets and potentials of slums and their residents using appropriate and affordable technologies. Smart slums aim to improve the quality of life and well-being of slum dwellers while preserving their identity and diversity. Some examples of smart slum initiatives in Dharavi are: - The Dharavi Biennale: A biennial art festival that showcases the creativity and innovation of Dharavi's residents through various forms of expression, such as painting, photography, sculpture, installation, performance, film, music, and poetry. The festival also engages with social issues such as health, environment, gender, and violence. - The Dharavi Project: A digital platform that documents and promotes the stories and talents of Dharavi's artists and entrepreneurs through multimedia content such as videos, podcasts , blogs , and social media . The project also provides training , mentorship , networking , and exposure opportunities for Dharavi's youth. - The Dharavi Redevelopment Project: A participatory planning process that involves the slum dwellers in designing their own future neighborhood based on their needs , preferences , aspirations , and capacities . The process uses digital tools such as mapping , modeling , simulation , visualization , and feedback systems to facilitate collaboration , communication , and decision making among various stakeholders. - The Dharavi Smart City Project: A pilot project that aims to improve Dharavi's infrastructure , services , and governance using smart technologies such as sensors , cameras , drones , mobile apps , cloud computing , big data analytics , artificial intelligence , blockchain , and internet of things (IoT) . The project focuses on areas such as water management , waste management , energy management , mobility management , health management , education management , security management , and civic engagement. The benefits of smart slum development for Dharavi and Mumbai are manifold. Smart slums can: - Enhance the dignity and empowerment of slum dwellers by recognizing their rights , contributions , potentials , and diversity. - Improve the efficiency and effectiveness of slum infrastructure and services by optimizing resources and reducing costs and risks. - Increase the resilience and adaptability of slums to cope with shocks and stresses such as climate change and disasters. - Foster innovation and entrepreneurship in slums by creating new opportunities and markets for products and services. - Strengthen social cohesion and harmony in slums by facilitating dialogue and collaboration among different groups and cultures. - Promote integration and inclusion of slums in the city by enhancing their visibility, connectivity, and accessibility. - Contribute to the overall development and sustainability of the city by reducing poverty, inequality, and environmental impact. However, smart slum development also has some drawbacks and challenges. Smart slums can: - Increase the vulnerability and dependency of slum dwellers on technology that may be unreliable, inaccessible, or unaffordable. - Expose slum dwellers to new risks such as cyberattacks, data breaches, privacy violations, and digital exclusion. - Create new forms of inequality and conflict among slum dwellers based on their access to and use of technology. - Disrupt the existing social and cultural practices and values of slum dwellers that may not be compatible with technology. - Threaten the identity and diversity of slums by imposing standardized and homogenized solutions that may not suit their specific needs and contexts. Therefore, smart slum development requires a careful and balanced approach that considers both the opportunities and the challenges of technology for slums. It also requires a participatory and inclusive approach that involves slum dwellers as active agents and beneficiaries of smart slum initiatives. Moreover, it requires a holistic and integrated approach that links smart slum initiatives with other urban policies and programs that address the root causes and structural factors of slum formation and persistence. # Conclusion Slums in Mumbai are a complex and dynamic phenomenon that pose significant challenges for urban development. However, they also offer valuable opportunities for innovation and transformation. Smart slums are a new vision for slum rehabilitation that aims to use technology to improve the infrastructure, services, and governance of slums in a way that is inclusive, participatory, and sustainable. Smart slums have the potential to enhance the resilience of both slums and their residents, as well as the city as a whole. However, smart slums also have some drawbacks and challenges that need to be addressed carefully and balancedly. Smart slums are not a panacea or a magic bullet for solving all the problems of slums. They are rather a tool or a means to achieve a larger goal: making Mumbai a more livable, equitable, and sustainable city for all its citizens. ## FAQs - What are slums? Slums are heavily populated urban areas characterized by substandard housing and squalor. Slums typically lack adequate access to water, sanitation, electricity, health care, education, and security. - How many slums are there in Mumbai? According to a 2011 census, there are about 3,000 slums in Mumbai, housing about 9 million people, or 41 percent of the city's population. - What is Dharavi? Dharavi is the largest and most famous slum in Mumbai. It is also considered to be the world's third largest slum after Pakistan's Orangi Town (Karachi) and Mexico's Neza-Chalco-Itza (Mexico City). It has an area of about 2.39 square kilometers (0.92 square miles) and a population of about 1 million people. - What are smart slums? Smart slums are slums that use technology to improve their infrastructure, services, and governance in a way that is inclusive, participatory, and sustainable. - What are some examples of smart slum initiatives in Dharavi? Some examples of smart slum initiatives in Dharavi are: - The Dharavi Biennale: A biennial art festival that showcases the creativity and innovation of Dharavi's residents. - The Dharavi Project: A digital platform that documents and promotes the stories and talents of Dharavi's artists and entrepreneurs. - The Dharavi Redevelopment Project: A participatory planning process that involves the slum dwellers in designing their own future neighborhood. - The Dharavi Smart City Project: A pilot project that aims to improve Dharavi's infrastructure , services , and governance using smart technologies such as sensors , cameras , drones , mobile apps , cloud computing , big data analytics , artificial intelligence , blockchain , and internet of things (IoT) .




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