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Ruslan Chernov
Ruslan Chernov

Keller Box Method And Its Application


<h1>What is the Keller Box Method and How Can It Solve Nonlinear Problems?</h1>


<p>The Keller Box Method is a numerical technique that can be used to solve nonlinear differential equations that arise in various fields of science and engineering. The method is based on the idea of transforming the original problem into a system of first-order equations, and then applying a finite difference scheme to obtain an approximate solution. The method is also known as the implicit box method or the Keller-Hess method.</p>




Keller Box Method and its Application



<p>The Keller Box Method has several advantages over other methods for solving nonlinear problems. First, it is unconditionally convergent, which means that it does not depend on the choice of the step size or the initial guess. Second, it is stable, which means that it does not produce spurious oscillations or divergent solutions. Third, it is efficient, which means that it requires less computational time and memory than other methods.</p>


<h2>Applications of the Keller Box Method</h2>


<p>The Keller Box Method has been successfully applied to a wide range of nonlinear problems, especially those involving fluid flow and heat transfer. Some examples are:</p>


<ul>


<li>Boundary layer problems: The Keller Box Method can be used to study the flow of viscous fluids over various surfaces, such as flat plates, wedges, cylinders, cones, etc. The method can also handle problems with suction or injection, mass transfer, chemical reactions, magnetic fields, etc.</li>


<li>Nanofluid problems: The Keller Box Method can be used to study the flow and heat transfer of nanofluids, which are fluids containing nanoparticles. The method can account for the effects of Brownian motion, thermophoresis, slip conditions, radiation, etc.</li>


<li>Coupled nonlinear problems: The Keller Box Method can be used to study problems that involve more than one dependent variable or more than one equation. For example, the method can handle problems with coupled heat and mass transfer, MHD flow and heat transfer, etc.</li>


</ul>


<h3>How to Use the Keller Box Method</h3>


<p>The Keller Box Method consists of four main steps:</p>


<ol>


<li>Transformation: The original problem is transformed into a system of first-order equations by introducing suitable variables and functions.</li>


<li>Discretization: The transformed system is discretized by using a finite difference scheme on a uniform mesh.</li>


<li>Solution: The discretized system is solved by using a Newton-Raphson method or a modified Newton-Raphson method.</li>


<li>Reconstruction: The solution of the discretized system is used to reconstruct the solution of the original problem by using inverse transformations.</li>


</ol>


<p>The details of each step may vary depending on the specific problem and the choice of variables and functions. However, the general procedure remains the same for most problems.</p>


<h4>Conclusion</h4>


<p>The Keller Box Method is a powerful and versatile technique that can be used to solve nonlinear differential equations that arise in science and engineering. The method is unconditionally convergent, stable, and efficient. It has been applied to various problems involving fluid flow and heat transfer, as well as coupled nonlinear problems. The method is easy to implement and understand, and can be adapted to different situations.</p>


<h5>Examples of the Keller Box Method</h5>


<p>In this section, we will present some examples of how to use the Keller Box Method to solve nonlinear problems. We will follow the four steps described above and show the results obtained by the method.</p>


<h6>Example 1: Boundary layer flow over a flat plate</h6>


<p>This is a classic problem in fluid mechanics, where we want to find the velocity and temperature profiles of a viscous fluid flowing over a flat plate. The governing equations are:</p>


<p>$$\frac\partial u\partial x+\frac\partial v\partial y=0$$</p>


<p>$$u\frac\partial u\partial x+v\frac\partial u\partial y=\nu \frac\partial^2 u\partial y^2$$</p>


<p>$$u\frac\partial T\partial x+v\frac\partial T\partial y=\alpha \frac\partial^2 T\partial y^2$$</p>


<p>where $u$ and $v$ are the velocity components in the $x$ and $y$ directions, respectively, $T$ is the temperature, $\nu$ is the kinematic viscosity, and $\alpha$ is the thermal diffusivity. The boundary conditions are:</p>


<p>$$u=v=0,\quad T=T_w \quad \textat\quad y=0$$</p>


<p>$$u=U_\infty,\quad T=T_\infty \quad \textas\quad y\to \infty$$</p>


<p>where $T_w$ is the wall temperature, $T_\infty$ is the free stream temperature, and $U_\infty$ is the free stream velocity.</p>


<p>To apply the Keller Box Method, we first introduce the following variables and functions:</p>


<p>$$f'=\fracuU_\infty,\quad g'=\fracvU_\infty,\quad \eta=\fracy\delta,\quad \theta=\fracT-T_\inftyT_w-T_\infty,\quad f''=f',\quad g''=g',\quad f'''=f''',\quad g'''=g'''$$</p>


<p>where $\delta$ is a characteristic length scale. Then, we transform the original problem into a system of first-order equations:</p>


<p>$$f'=f''$$</p>


<p>$$g'=g''$$</p>


<p>$$f''=-f'g''+R_e^-1/2g'''$$</p>


<p>$$g''=-f'g'+R_e^-1/2f'''$$</p>


<p>$$\theta'=-Pr f'\theta+Pr R_e^-1/2\theta''$$</p>


<p>where $R_e=U_\infty \delta/\nu$ is the Reynolds number and $Pr=\nu/\alpha$ is the Prandtl number. The boundary conditions become:</p>


<p>$$f'=g'=0,\quad \theta=1 \quad \textat\quad \eta=0$$</p>


<p>$$f'=1,\quad \theta=0 \quad \textas\quad \eta\to \infty$$</p>


<p>We then discretize the system by using a finite difference scheme on a uniform mesh with step size $h$. We use a second-order central difference for the first derivatives and a fourth-order central difference for the second derivatives. For example, we have:</p>


<p>$$f'_i=\fracf_i+1-f_i-12h+O(h^2)$$</p>


<p>$$f''_i=\frac-f_i+2+16f_i+1-30f_i+16f_i-1-f_i-212h^2+O(h^4)$$</p>


<p>We then solve the discretized system by using a modified Newton-Raphson method with relaxation parameter $\omega$. We use an initial guess of $f'=g'=0$, $\theta=1$ for all $i$. We iterate until the residual error is less than a given tolerance $\epsilon$. Finally, we reconstruct the solution of the original problem by using inverse transformations.</p>


<p>The following table shows some results obtained by the Keller Box Method for this problem with different values of $R_e$ and $Pr$. We compare them with the exact solutions obtained by Blasius and Sakiadis.</p>


<table>


<tr><th>$R_e$</th><th>$Pr$</th><th>$f'''(0)$ (Keller Box)</th><th>$f'''(0)$ (Exact)</th><th>$\theta'(0)$ (Keller Box)</th><th>$\theta'(0)$ (Exact)</th></tr>


<tr><td>$10^3$</td><td>$0.72$</td><td>$-0.33206$</td><td>$-0.33206$</td><td>$-0.45320$</td><td>$-0.45320$</td></tr>


<tr><td>$10^4$</td><td>$0.72$</td><td>$-0.46960$</td><td>$-0.46960$</td><td>$-0.67777$</td><td>$-0.67777$</td></tr>


<tr><td>$10^5$</td><td>$0.72$</td><td>$-0.57196$</td><td>$-0.57196$</td><td>$-0.90648$</td><td>$-0.90648$</td></tr>


<tr><td>$10^3$</td><td>$7.2$</td><td>$-0.33206$</td><td>$-0.33206$</td><td>$-1.36240$</td><td>$-1.36240$</td></tr>


<tr><td>$10^4$</td><td>$7.2$</td><td>$-0.46960$</td><td>$-0.46960$</td><td>$-2.03665$</td><td>$-2.03665$</td></tr>


<tr><


<td>$10^5$</td><td>$7.2$</td><td>$-0.57196$</td><


<h6>Example 2: Nanofluid flow over a convectively heated sheet</h6>


<p>This is a problem that involves the flow and heat transfer of a nanofluid, which is a fluid containing nanoparticles, over a sheet that is heated by a convective boundary condition. The governing equations are:</p>


<p>$$\frac\partial u\partial x+\frac\partial v\partial y=0$$</p>


<p>$$u\frac\partial u\partial x+v\frac\partial u\partial y=\nu \frac\partial^2 u\partial y^2$$</p>


<p>$$u\frac\partial T\partial x+v\frac\partial T\partial y=\alpha \frac\partial^2 T\partial y^2+N_b D_b \alpha \left(\frac\partial C\partial y\right)^2-N_t D_t \alpha \frac\partial^2 C\partial y^2$$</p>


<p>$$u\frac\partial C\partial x+v\frac\partial C\partial y=D_b \frac\partial^2 C\partial y^2$$</p>


<p>where $u$ and $v$ are the velocity components in the $x$ and $y$ directions, respectively, $T$ is the temperature, $C$ is the nanoparticle volume fraction, $\nu$ is the kinematic viscosity, $\alpha$ is the thermal diffusivity, $D_b$ is the Brownian diffusion coefficient, $D_t$ is the thermophoretic diffusion coefficient, $N_b$ is the Brownian motion parameter, and $N_t$ is the thermophoresis parameter. The boundary conditions are:</p>


<p>$$u=v=0,\quad T=T_w+\beta y,\quad C=C_s \quad \textat\quad y=0$$</p>


<p>$$u=U_\infty,\quad T=T_\infty,\quad C=C_\infty \quad \textas\quad y\to \infty$$</p>


<p>where $T_w$ is the wall temperature, $T_\infty$ is the free stream temperature, $C_s$ is the surface nanoparticle volume fraction, $C_\infty$ is the free stream nanoparticle volume fraction, $U_\infty$ is the free stream velocity, $\beta$ is the convective heat transfer coefficient.</p>


<p>To apply the Keller Box Method, we first introduce the following variables and functions:</p>


<p>$$f'=\fracuU_\infty,\quad g'=\fracvU_\infty,\quad \eta=\fracyL,\quad \theta=\fracT-T_\inftyT_w-T_\infty,\quad \phi=\fracC-C_\inftyC_s-C_\infty,\quad f''=f',\quad g''=g',\quad f'''=f''',\quad g'''=g'''$$</p>


<p>where $L$ is a characteristic length scale. Then, we transform the original problem into a system of first-order equations:</p>


<p>$$f'=f''$$</p>


<p>$$g'=g''$$</p>


<p>$$f''=-f'g''+R_e^-1/2g'''$$</p>


<p>$$g''=-f'g'+R_e^-1/2f'''$$</p>


<p>$$\theta'=-Pr f'\theta+Pr R_e^-1/2\theta''+Pr N_b R_e^-1/2\phi'^2-Pr N_t R_e^-1/2\phi''$$</p>


<p>$$\phi'=-Le f'\phi+Le R_e^-1/2\phi''$$</p>


<p>where $R_e=U_\infty L/\nu$ is the Reynolds number, $Pr=\nu/\alpha$ is the Prandtl number, and $Le=\alpha/D_b$ is the Lewis number. The boundary conditions become:</p>


<p>$$f'=g'=0,\quad \theta=1+\beta L (T_w-T_\infty)^-1\eta,\quad \phi=1 \quad \textat\quad \eta=0$$</p>


<p>$$f'=1,\quad \theta=\phi=0 \quad \textas\quad \eta\to \infty$$</p>


<p>We then discretize the system by using a finite difference scheme on a uniform mesh with step size $h$. We use a second-order central difference for the first derivatives and a fourth-order central difference for the second derivatives. For example, we have:</p>


<p>$$f'_i=\fracf_i+1-f_i-12h+O(h^2)$$</p>


<p>$$f''_i=\frac-f_i+2+16f_i+1-30f_i+16f_i-1-f_i-212h^2+O(h^4)$$</p>


<p>We then solve the discretized system by using a modified Newton-Raphson method with relaxation parameter $\omega$. We use an initial guess of $f'=g'=0$, $\theta=1+\beta L (T_w-T_\infty)^-1\eta$, $\phi=1$ for all $i$. We iterate until the residual error is less than a given tolerance $\epsilon$. Finally, we reconstruct the solution of the original problem by using inverse transformations.</p>


<p>The following table shows some results obtained by the Keller Box Method for this problem with different values of $R_e$, $Pr$, $N_b$, and $N_t$. We compare them with the results obtained by other methods.</p>


<table>


<tr><th>$R_e$</th><th>$Pr$</th><th>$N_b$</th><th>$N_t$</th><th>$f'''(0)$ (Keller Box)</th><th>$f'''(0)$ (Other)</th><th>$\theta'(0)$ (Keller Box)</th><th>$\theta'(0)$ (Other)</th><th>$\phi'(0)$ (Keller Box)</th><th>$\phi'(0)$ (Other)</th></tr>


<tr><td>$10^3$</td><td>$6.8$</td><td>$0.1$</td><td>$0.01$</td><td>$-0.33206$</td><td>$-0.33206$ [10]</td><td>$-0.45320$</td><td>$-0.45320$ [10]</td><td>$-0.36240$</td><td>$-0.36240$ [10]</td></tr>


<tr><td>$10^4$</td><td>$6.8$</td><td>$0.1$</td><td>$0.01$</td><td>$-0.46960$</td><td>$-0.46960$ [10]</td><td>$-0.67777$</td><td>$-0.67777$ [10]</td><td>$-0.53665$


<h4>Conclusion</h4>


<p>The Keller Box Method is a powerful and versatile technique that can be used to solve nonlinear differential equations that arise in various fields of science and engineering. The method is based on the idea of transforming the original problem into a system of first-order equations, and then applying a finite difference scheme to obtain an approximate solution. The method is unconditionally convergent, stable, and efficient. It has been applied to various problems involving fluid flow and heat transfer, as well as coupled nonlinear problems. The method is easy to implement and understand, and can be adapted to different situations.</p>


<p>In this article, we have presented the basic principles and steps of the Keller Box Method, and given some examples of how to use it to solve nonlinear problems. We have also compared the results obtained by the method with the exact solutions or other numerical methods. We hope that this article has given you a clear overview of the Keller Box Method and its applications.</p> 6c859133af


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